Mysterious Russia burns $10m of gas per day in huge flare near Nord Stream 1

According to an analysis, Russia burns $10m (£8.4m), of gas per day at a plant close to its border with Finland.

Experts claimed that the unprecedented release of the gas which was previously exported to Europe was unprecedented.

Further concerns have been raised about rising energy costs and their environmental impacts.

A huge flare was seen at the Portovaya new liquified gas (LNG), plant, northwest of St Petersburg. It is located close to a compressor station at the start of the Nord Stream 1 pipeline.

The pipeline has been shut down since mid-July. This is Germany’s claim that it was a political move in response to Russia’s invasion. Russia claims that the problem is due to technical faults.

According to researchers, the increase in heat from the facility was a result of gas flaring.

Experts are puzzled by the scale of the gas burning, even though it is common in these plants.

Dr Jessica McCarty from Miami University is a specialist in satellite data and said that she had never seen an LNG plant so flare.

“We saw this massive peak around June and it didn’t stop there. It has remained very unusually high.

Experts also believe that flaring is a deliberate act.

The trade embargo in Europe is believed to have caused the release of the gas since Russia cannot procure spare parts.

Concerns have been raised about the potential environmental impacts that a large fire could have on Arctic ecosystems.

This flare releases 9,000 tonnes of CO2 equivalent each day. It also releases black carbon, which is sooty particles that are left over from incomplete burnings.

After the coronavirus lockdowns were lifted and economies returned back to normality, energy prices shot up.

The Russian invasion of Ukraine in February resulted in prices rising again. Russia had previously supplied 40% of Europe’s gas.

Some countries, such as Spain and Germany, were forced to adopt energy-saving measures.


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